Adrián Gustavo Turjanski - University of Buenos Aires

Adrián Gustavo Turjanski
Adrián Gustavo Turjanski

Adrián Turjanski obtained his Master degree in Chemistry from the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina in 1999, and then his PhD in Biophysics in 2003. He conducted postdoctoral studies in the area of molecular modeling from 2003 to 2005 in the Department of Physiology and Molecular Biology, School of Sciences, University of Buenos Aires. He then conducted postdoctoral work in Bioinformatics as a 2005 Pew Latin American Fellow in the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research at the National Institutes of Health. Bethesda, MD,USA. In 2008 he returned to Argentina where he is in charge of the Structural Bioinformatics Lab, in the school of sciences at the University of Buenos Aires. He is part of the research staff of the National Research and Technology Council (CONICET). He has also been Full Professor of Bioinformatics at the University of Buenos Aires since 2008. In 2013 he became director of the Argentinian Bioinformatic Platform and in 2015 his the Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Sciences at the School of Sciences. His research is focused in the developing and application of Bioinformatics tools for drug discovery, going from the genome to structural characterizations of proteins.

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Andre C Ponce de Leon F de Carvalho - University of São Paulo/USP

Andre Ponce de Leon

André C. P. L. F. de Carvalho is Full Professor in the department of Computer Sciences, University of São Paulo, Brazil. He was Associate Professor in the University of Guelph, Canada, Visiting Researcher in the University of Porto, Portugal and Visiting Professor in the University of Kent, UK. He is Assessor ad hoc for funding Agencies in Brazil, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic and UK. His main research interests are Data Science, Machine Leearning and Data Science. Prof. de Carvalho has several publications in these areas, including 10 paper awards from conferences organized by ACM, IEEE. He was the founding director of the Center of Machine Learning in Data Analysis, University of São Paulo and is currently the vice-director of the Center for Mathematical Sciences Applied to Industry, University of São Paulo . He is a member of the Steering Committee of the International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA) Latin American and Caribbean Chapter and of the Brazilian Science for Education Network.

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Daniel Yasumasa Takahashi - Young Scientist Award

Daniel Yasumasa TakahashiDr. Daniel Yasumasa Takahashi obtained his PhD in Bioinformatics from the University of São Paulo in 2009. He is currently an associate research scholar at Princeton University, Department of Neuroscience, and was recently hired by the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte. He

Dr. Takahashi is internationally recognized for his interdisciplinary work in the area of primate vocal communication. He studies the evolutionary, ontological, and neurobiological bases of the emergence of vocal communication. Dr. Takahashi conducted the first experimental demonstration that non-human primates also present vocal learning. The impact of this finding is reflected in prominent publications in Science (Takahashi et al., 2015), Current Biology (Takahashi et al., 2017, Takahashi et al., 2013) and eLife (Teramoto et al.), and appeard in the coverof Science and Current Biology. His work has also been prominent in the world media (BBC News, National Geographic News Watch, Daily Mail UK, Decoded Science, The Independent, Wired, io9, Science, Nature, National Public Radio, Deutschlandfunk, Science News, Journal of FAPESP , Estadão). Dr. Takahashi has been constantly invited to give lectures at international conferences with more than 30 guest lectures on his curriculum. He currently has 47 articles published in international journals, with an H-index of 24 and more than two thousand citations

This scientific recognition dates back to his doctoral thesis, obtained under the supervision of Koichi Sameshima (Faculty of Medicine of USP) and Luiz Antonio Baccalá (Polytechnic School of USP). Thanks to his thesis and publications focused on measures of information flow in neuroscience, he received the prestigious and highly-competed Pew Latin American Fellowship to undertake a postdoctoral in the United States in the laboratory of Prof. Asif Ghazanfar.

The great differential in his work is the constant use of mathematically rigorous quantitative analysis with biological questions of relevance, generating truly interdisciplinary works.

Further information can be gathered on his personal web page.

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David F. Burke - University of Cambridge

David F. Burke
David F. Burke

David graduated in Chemistry and Computer Science from Kings College, University of London followed by a Masters degree in Modelling of Molecular and Biological Processes from the Department. of Crystallography, Birkbeck College, University of London. In 1995, he recieved his PhD in Biophysics from the Institute of Cancer Research, University of London. This resulted in the prostate cancer drug Zytiga (Abiraterone acetate). He joined the Biochemistry department, University of Cambridge in 1997 developing next generation comparative protein modelling software. In 2007, he moved to the Zoology department to apply computational biology and bioinformatic tools to understand the evolution of the influenza virus. He has been Section Editor (Computational analysis) for BMC Structural Biology since 2015.

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Glória Regina Franco - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

Glória Regina Franco
Glória Regina Franco

Gloria Franco holds a bachelor’s in Biology (1988) from Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), and a MSc. (1992) and Ph.D. (1996) degrees in Biochemistry and Immunology from the same University. Since her Ph.D. she has been working with sequencing and annotation of genomes and transcriptomes of protozoan and worm parasites and bacteria. In 2014 she was a Visiting Professor at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Australia, working with non-coding RNAs involved in neuronal plasticity and disease. She is currently Full Professor at the Department of Biochemistry and Immunology/UFMG and Coordinator of the Postgraduate Program in Bioinformatics at UFMG. She is a founding member of the Brazilian Association of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (AB3C) and its previous President. She has experience in Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics, working mainly with genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. She has also a great interest in teaching Bioinformatics and Genomics for undergraduate and graduate students.

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Gregorio Iraola - Institut Pasteur de Montevideo

Ronnie Alves
Gragorio Iraola

Dr. Gregorio Iraola is a computational microbiologist. His post-graduation studies started with a Master in Bioinformatics before obtaining a PhD in Biology focused on microbial genomics at the Universidad de la República and the Institut Pasteur Montevideo in Uruguay. Since 2017 he is a staff Associate Researcher at the Bioinformatics Unit in the Institut Pasteur Montevideo. Also, since 2015 he has been a visitor scientist at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the Institut Pasteur Paris. From Uruguay, he leads several research lines aiming to develop and apply computational approaches for studying the microbial world. His work has been focused on understanding the evolution of viruses that affect livestock and pets using phylodynamics; and fundamentally on uncovering the evolutionary forces shaping the genomes of zoonotic bacteria like Campylobacter, Leptospira and Mycobacterium. Among his ongoing projects stands out a joint Latin American effort to study the population dynamics of Clostridium difficile using genomic epidemiology approaches. Recently, he became interested in complementing his work in pathogenomics with microbiome approaches, specifically by applying cityscale metagenomics to analyze antibiotic resistance dynamics in enterobacteria from urban environments. More recently, he got involved in science communication as a columnist aiming to bring microbiology and genomics closer to the society.

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Lars Juhl Jensen - University of Copenhagen

Lars Juhl Jensen
Lars Juhl Jensen

Lars Juhl Jensen started his research career in Søren Brunak’s group at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), from where he in 2002 received the Ph.D. degree in bioinformatics for his work on non-homology based protein function prediction. During this time, he also developed methods for visualization of microbial genomes, pattern recognition in promoter regions, and microarray analysis. From 2003 to 2008, he was at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) where he worked on literature mining, integration of large-scale experimental datasets, and analysis of biological interaction networks. Since 2009, he has continued this line of research as a professor at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research at the Panum Institute in Copenhagen and as a founder, owner and scientific advisor of Intomics A/S. He is a co-author of more than 170 scientific publications that have in total received more than 20,000 citations. He was awarded the Lundbeck Foundation Talent Prize in 2003, his work on cell-cycle research was named “Break-through of the Year” in 2006 by the magazine Ingeniøren, his work on text mining won the first prize in the “Elsevier Grand Challenge: Knowledge Enhancement in the Life Sciences” in 2009, and he was awarded the Lundbeck Foundation Prize for Young Scientists in 2010.

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Michiel de Hoon - RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences

Michiel Jan Laurens De Hoon
Michiel Jan Laurens De Hoonr

My undergraduate degree was in Applied Physics at Delft University of Technology (Netherlands), and I obtained my Ph.D. in 2001 in Physics from the University of California, Berkeley, where I was first introduced to computational biology. I did a postdoc in bioinformatics first at the University of Tokyo and then at Columbia University in New York, and in 2007 I moved to RIKEN in Yokohama where I am now team leader of the Laboratory of Applied Computational Genomics in the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences. At RIKEN I have been heavily involved in the FANTOM (Functional Annotation of Mammalian Genomes) project, a large consortium effort to understand the mammalian (mainly human and mouse) genome and transcriptome. I am currently co-leading (together with Jay Shin and Piero Carninci at RIKEN) the sixth edition of FANTOM, where our goal is to functionally classify and annotate long non-coding RNAs.

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Ronnie Alves - Instituto Tecnológico Vale/ITV

Ronnie Alves
Ronnie Alves

Ronnie Alves received his PhD in Computer Science(Artificial Intelligence) from the University of Minho at Braga (Portugal) in April'2008, under the supervision of Prof. Dr.Orlando Belo. While pursuing his PhD studies, he also served as a Visiting Researcher in the Data Mining Group at DAIS Lab in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA) led by Prof. Dr. Jiawei Han and in the Bioinformatics Research Group at Pablo de Olavide University – Sevilla, Spain) led by Prof. Dr. Jesus Aguilar-Ruiz. Before starting his Ph.D, he also worked as IT Consultant on several industrial data mining projects (From Retail to Telecommunications) in Brazil and Portugal. He was awarded a Postdoctoral Fellowship (Transcriptomics) from the French National Center for Scientific Research(CNRS) in the Virtual Biology Lab at the Institute of Biology Valrose (iBV) at Nice from September'2008 to March'2010. Followed by another two-year postdoc position on Machine Learning and Bioinformatics at theInstitute of Informatics at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS). Being also a Collaborating Professor in the Department of Theoretical Informatics. He worked as Researcher Fellow (Jeune Chercheur) in the Lab. of Computer Science, Robotics and Microelectronics of Montpellier (LIRMM), being a member of the Computational Biology Institute (IBC) at the Université Montpellier (UM) from September'2014 to February'2016. He is an Associate Researcher in the Environmental Genomics Research Group at the Instituto Tecnologico Vale (ITV). 
He holds the position of Collaborating Professor in the Computer Science Graduate's Program of UFPA (PPGCC-UFPA) and in the Professional Master's in Sustainable Use of Natural Resources in Tropical Regions (MProf-ITV). He supervises Ph.D and MSc students in the research area of Intelligent Systems, focusing on bioinformatics and machine learning. He is also a member of the Special Committee on Computational Biology (CE-BioComp) of the Brazilian Computer Society (SBC).

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William Pearson - University of Virginia School of Medicine

William Pearson
William Pearson

Dr. Pearson received his PhD in Biochemistry from the California Institute of Technology and did a post-doctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. In 1983, he joined the faculty in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Virginia, and, while waiting to recruit his first graduate student, wrote the FASTP program for rapid protein similarity searches (working with David Lipman). FASTP evolved into FASTA, which revolutionized the process of making DNA and protein sequence comparisons by providing faster, more rigorous approaches and improved scoring techniques. The FASTA text-based sequence format became a standard format in bioinformatics. FASTA is the second most widely used program for searching protein and DNA sequence databases. More recently, Dr. Pearson has become interested in more effective strategies for integrating sequence annotations into sequence alignments. Dr. Pearson has published more than 75 articles and 23 book chapters. His 1988 PNAS paper co-authored with David Lipman, “Improved tools for Biological Sequence Comparison”, has been cited more than 10,000 times.
Dr. Pearson is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He speaks widely on bioinformatics topics, teaches a course in computational biology at the University of Virginia, has co-directed the CSHL Computational and Comparative Genomics course for 20 years, and participated in the Woods Hole Workshop on Molecular Evolution since 1995. In 2018, he was elected a Fellow of the International Society for Computational Biology.

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