Benilton Carvalho

Benilton Carvalho

Benilton Carvalho is a Ph.D. in Biostatistics by Johns Hopkins University with a background in Statistics (B.Sc. and M.Sc. by University of Campinas) with nearly 15 years of experience in bioinformatics software and methodology development, having authored more than 150 Bioconductor (data and software) packages since 2003. Benilton worked at Affymetrix (Santa Clara, US) and consulted for NimbleGen (Madison, US), went to University of Cambridge (Cambridge, UK) for postdoctoral studies with Professor Simon Tavaré FRS, FMedSci. After returning to Brazil, Benilton created the Biostatistics and Computational Biology Laboratory and co-founded the Brazilian Initiative on Precision Medicine (BIPMed). Benilton is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Statistics and Advisor to the Vice President for Research at UNICAMP.

Dr. Bart Weimer

Dr. Bart Weimer

Dr. Bart Weimer is Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Population Health and Reproduction in the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. He obtained a BS in Microbiology/Immunology from the University of Arizona and a Ph.D. from Utah State University, and post-doctoral training at the University of Melbourne. His group embraces a systems biology approach using large-scale genomic and metabolomic analysis to study the link between food, health and the microbiome using microbial physiology concepts. His group leads the 100K Pathogen Genome Sequencing Project to link agriculture, the environment, and human disease. Dr. Weimer's research also encompasses population genomics of bacteria to examine persistence and metabolism. He has mentored 35 graduate students, published over 160 manuscripts, obtained six patents, and edited four books.

Támas Korcsmáros

Támas Korcsmáros

Tamás Korcsmáros started his research work as a high-school student in a biochemistry laboratory and for five years he worked on the experimental analysis of redox adaptation. He graduated as a molecular biologist (Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary) and as a PhD student developed a gap-filling signalling network database, SignaLink. In Budapest, he established the NetBiol - Network Biology group, which focuses on signalling and regulatory networks. The group has been developing novel databases and web-services to meet key scientific community needs.
In March 2014, Tamás moved to Norwich and works as a Computational Biology Fellow at the Earlham Institute and in the IFR, Institute of Food Research. His multi-disciplinary group is currently combining computational and experimental approaches to predict, analyse and validate host-microbe interactions in the gut, especially in relation to the regulation of autophagy by microbes and upon disease conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and cancer. Tamás also took major part in the organisation of eight international conferences (each with more than 1000 participants), he is the co-founder of two network analysis companies and coordinated 3 innovation grant programs. Since 2001, Tamás has been participating as a volunteer in Hungarian and international talent support organizations. He is currently the Chairman of the Research Student Foundation supporting 5000 high-school research students.